Carbon dating for dummies contact updating


27-Jan-2017 00:25

Scientists estimate that the Earth is about 4.5 billion years old, based on radioisotope dating techniques.To understand how this process works, you need to know a little bit about atoms and isotopes.Obviously this only works for things which once contained carbon—it can’t be used to date rocks and minerals, for example. We obviously need to know this to be able to work out at what point the ‘clock’ began to tick.We’ve seen that it would have been the same as in the atmosphere at the time the specimen died. Do scientists assume that it was the same as it is now? It is well known that the industrial revolution, with its burning of huge masses of coal, etc.by Dr Carl Wieland An attempt to explain this very important method of dating and the way in which, when fully understood, it supports a ‘short’ timescale.

To determine the age of material, researchers compare the ratio of the parent and daughter products that were initially in the sample with the ratio of these products at the current time.Hydrogen, for example, has one electron and one proton.Sometimes, it also has a neutron, in which case it is called deuterium.The article is in straightforward language and the non-technical reader could profitably work through it.

, we find that this ration is the same if we sample a leaf from a tree, or a part of your body.Other isotopes are unstable because the different number of neutrons interacts with the other atomic components in such a way that, over a period of time, the isotope changes into some other atom.



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